Transport 2050 | Phase 2

Phase 2 public engagement for Transport 2050 concluded on May 14, 2021. Thank you to everyone who took the time to provide us with feedback.

Transport 2050 is here!  

Thank you to everyone who shared their vision and ideas for the future of transportation.  

Transport 2050 — the region’s new 30-year transportation strategy — has been officially adopted, setting the stage for major investments and policies to come. 

Transport 2050 was built from TransLink’s largest-ever public engagement. Over three phases of consultation between 2019 and 2021, people submitted over 38,000 surveys and shared over 4,000 ideas for the future of transportation. Through 360 in-person or virtual events across 27 municipalities, we had over 160,000 conversations with the public and engaged over 500 stakeholder groups. 

Visit transport2050.ca to see the final strategy or access the engagement or technical documents. 

Transport 2050 is here!  

Thank you to everyone who shared their vision and ideas for the future of transportation.  

Transport 2050 — the region’s new 30-year transportation strategy — has been officially adopted, setting the stage for major investments and policies to come. 

Transport 2050 was built from TransLink’s largest-ever public engagement. Over three phases of consultation between 2019 and 2021, people submitted over 38,000 surveys and shared over 4,000 ideas for the future of transportation. Through 360 in-person or virtual events across 27 municipalities, we had over 160,000 conversations with the public and engaged over 500 stakeholder groups. 

Visit transport2050.ca to see the final strategy or access the engagement or technical documents. 

Phase 2 public engagement for Transport 2050 concluded on May 14, 2021. Thank you to everyone who took the time to provide us with feedback.


Do you have questions about Phase 2? Ask us! Depending on the nature of the question, we’ll consider a direct message or public response to your inquiry.

  • Did we consider experiences from the Estonia Transportation system where 99% public services are 24 x 7. They have got very good experiences and inputs.

    srikar asked over 1 year ago

    Thanks for the comment srikar!

    We are regularly in touch with other transit agencies around the world, including through our involvement in the International Association of Public Transport.

    If you’re “Tallinn” us to consider the Estonian transportation system, we’ll definitely give it a look.

  • Metro Vancouver Regional Growth Strategy describes nine regional centres which exhibit larger scale issues. However, some of the closest centres are the most poorly connected by public transit. For example, Coquitlam Centre is only 16 km from Surrey Centre, but there is no convenient or direct connection. It involves hopping on three (yes, three!) trains and takes almost 60 minutes by public transit. The same trip takes only 16 minutes by car. Similarly, Maple Ridge Centre is only 18 km from Langley Centre, but there is no direct connection. It takes almost 60 minutes by public transit. The same trip takes only 18 minutes by car. This indicates that Translink priorities are out of sync with core growth centres identified in the Metro Vancouver Regional Strategy. Is Translink planning to rectify this?

    sanjarya asked over 1 year ago

    Hi sanjarya,

    Thanks for the questions.

    With regard to transit service, the focus of Transport 2050 Phase 2 (which runs April 19 – May 14) is to explore different approaches for building out the region’s rapid transit system. This feedback will inform the future rapid transit network’s structure.

    Later in 2021, we’ll share a draft Regional Transportation Strategy, which is being developed in coordination with Metro Vancouver and the next Regional Growth Strategy, also currently under development. This draft will include a focus on regional connectivity and improving connections between regional centres.

  • Hi there, Based on my observation, most company head quarters in BC are located in Vancouver - making it costly and higher traffic. One of translink’s solution for this might be to improve accessibility to Vancouver. However, in long term this is not sustainable due to increasing traffic in one area. There is another possible solution though - to persuade companies to build HQ on other area (e.g. Delta/ Surrey/ Langley/ White Rock). My question is, could Translink influence this initiative within the government? And do you think this would be a more sustainable idea compared to adding access to a congested area?

    Gab asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Gab, 

    Thanks for your question. You raise a good point about the importance of transportation and land use planning. It’s important to build transit where people need to work, so people have different options to move around the region.

    We are currently working with Metro Vancouver, who is leading the development of a new Regional Growth Strategy. Metro 2050, which covers regional land use, will be coordinated with Transport 2050. This way, development and transportation goals and actions can be closely aligned. For more information on Metro Vancouver’s Metro 2050, see this page.

  • Wondering about our Compass cards. Especially on a mixed use trip.

    Sharrilynn asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Sharrilynn,

    Thanks for the question.

    Compass Cards are currently used to access the region’s transit system. It works across various public transit modes: bus, SkyTrain, SeaBus. Meaning you can tap to enter one vehicle, and board a different vehicle using the same fare – provided the trip begins and ends within the same 90-minute window. We anticipate this interoperability would work for future transit expansions as well.

  • Is it possible to set KPIs at planning stage itself, as minimum targets the HAVE TO BE achieved? For e.g. from where I live in North Vancouver, getting to transit centres Phibbs Exchange takes (15-20 minutes during peak & 20-35 minutes during non-peak hours) and to Lonsdale Quay it is 25-30 minutes during peak and 30-45 minutes during non-peak hours respectively. (Both include wait times). Against this, driving to downtown takes 20-30 mins). What I mean by KPIs is from any point to a transit centre, it will not exceed 15 mins during peak and 25 mins during non-peak hours. Otherwise, where is the incentive to dump the automobile?

    csatish asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi csatish,

    Thank you for your question. The final Regional Transportation Strategy will include a range of goals, targets, and key performance indicators (KPIs) to monitor progress and guide decisions. These measures are still under development and we’ll be sure to pass along your suggestion to the planning team.

    You can learn about these when we share a draft strategy for feedback later in 2021


  • Is the rail line from White Rock to Vancouver and back under consideration for rapid transit?

    Bryon asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Bryon,

    Thanks for the question. With regard to transit service, the focus of Transport 2050 Phase 2 (which runs April 19 – May 14) is to explore different approaches for building out the region’s rapid transit system. This feedback will inform the future rapid transit network’s structure.

    Later in 2021, we’ll share a draft Regional Transportation Strategy, which will outline more detailed proposals for improving all types of transit in the region over the next 30 years. This will include how we can provide fast and reliable express and interregional connections for travel covering longer distances and consider the role that passenger rail and bus can play with that.

  • Translink requires a major change in mandate and culture in order to effect a significant shift towards active transportation. How is translink going to acquire the authority over land use necessary to create a 15 minute city? And what is the organization going to do to upgrade it's capacity for executing active transportation infrastructure, because to be quite frank, BC Parkway and Central Valley Greenway are poorly executed and demonstrate an alarming lack of leadership.

    Scott asked almost 2 years ago

    Thank you for your comments and questions on active transportation!

    It’s true that TransLink doesn’t have jurisdiction over land use. That’s why Transport 2050 is being developed in coordination with Metro Vancouver and local municipalities, who do have land use responsibilities. Where TransLink doesn’t have direct authority, there are a number of things we can do to support partners. For more information, I encourage you to check out the response to a similar question, which took place during a Reddit Ask Me Anything.

  • Pedestrian and bike friendly streets are needed however a push to educate the public to look both ways before crossing, to get off there phones, pay more attention to traffic and not run into the streets is needed. Can a public awareness campaign be incorporated into any action plan decided on? How is reducing the amount of lane choices for cars going to decrease travel times for cars? What is being done to increase flow rates and overall efficiency for car travel? With cars going electric, we will still need road space for personal transportation as its just not feasible to always carshare or take public transportation. Can we build proper turning lanes (L/R) at all major intersections regardless of cost? It will need to be done at some point as most busses take up two lanes to make a right turn. With inflation the power of our dollar is stronger today than it will be tomorrow. The cost to build the Millennium Line compared to the cost to have built it along with the Expo Line is a prime example. Why do we keep making the same mistakes that only cost the taxpayers? Boundary Rd needs to connect directly to the 91, thus reducing volume on the Knight and Oak St bridges respectively (which both need upgrading) and creating a north/south throughway to HWY1 that New West keeps denying with the 1A upgrade and McBride Tunnel. The new 1A bridge into a tunnel under McBride that connects to HWY 1 would be a great option as it will reduce surface traffic through New West, reduce road noise and offer the much needed North/South HWY connection that's missing. Carbon capture machines (on a smaller scale to the one in Squamish) should be added in all tunnels to help aid in meeting our climate goals.

    Alrick C. asked almost 2 years ago

    Thank you for your comments and questions! 

    The final strategy will contain a list of more detailed actions and strategies, including on how to reduce road congestion and address other priorities some of your comments have touched on, but on your comment on public awareness campaigns for pedestrians: the most effective action the region could take to keep pedestrians (and other active transportation users safe) is to separate them from general purpose traffic. The first action we are proposing (“people-first streets”) would help to do this.

  • When will we get back the service we lost when 239 route was discontinued. Seniors have gone from every 10-minute service to every half hour. Not all of us can walk that extra 3 blocks to catch the R2. Too many times I have had to wait 1/2 hour as the R2 does not connect with the 228.

    tigermousecat asked almost 2 years ago

    Thank you for your inquiry. 

    With regard to transit service, the focus of Transport 2050 Phase 2 (which runs April 19 – May 14) is to explore different approaches for building out the region’s rapid transit system. Feedback will inform the future rapid transit network’s structure.

    In the meantime, we’re studying how we could expand and improve other types of transit throughout the region, including HandyDART and local, interregional, and frequent service. 

    Later in 2021, we’ll share a draft Regional Transportation Strategy, which will outline more detailed proposals for improving all types of transit in the region over the next 30 years.

  • Hello, I could not find a free-form box for this but I had additional comments. Transport 2050 also needs to consider options for out-of-region travel. Many people have cars so they can do outdoor things in Squamish, North Shore and Whistler. Reliable, good transit NEEDS to service these areas, and have provisions to move equipment (skis/snowboards, mountain bikes, etc.), or people will just own a car, in order to travel these regions.

    Nicole Chan asked almost 2 years ago

    Thank you for your feedback.

    With regard to transit service, the focus of Transport 2050 Phase 2 (which runs April 19 – May 14) is to explore different approaches for building out the region’s rapid transit system. Feedback will inform the future rapid transit network’s structure.

    Later in 2021, we’ll share a draft Regional Transportation Strategy, which will outline more detailed proposals for improving all types of transit in the region over the next 30 years, including a focus on improving interregional connections to the Sea to Sky corridor and the Fraser Valley.

    During Phase 1 engagement, people shared thousands of ideas with us, including how to improve the customer experience, such as by providing some of the amenities you are suggesting.  While the purpose of the regional transportation strategy is to provide high-level direction, ideas for these amenities may be considered in other and future, more detailed plans.