2022 Investment Plan and Transport 2050: 10-Year Priorities

A young woman sitting and holding her skateboard while waiting at Marine Drive Station

From April 20 to May 4, 2022, we asked for feedback on the 2022 Investment Plan and Transport 2050: 10-Year Priorities.

Metro Vancouver, and everyone who lives, works, and plays here, enjoys a broad range of quality transportation choices. These transportation choices, which connect us to the people and places that matter most, are the result of investing in bold visions for the future of transportation.

Most recently, the region adopted Transport 2050, which builds on Metro Vancouver’s solid foundation of regional planning, to deliver the next 30 years of transportation improvements.

Now, we’re in the process of

From April 20 to May 4, 2022, we asked for feedback on the 2022 Investment Plan and Transport 2050: 10-Year Priorities.

Metro Vancouver, and everyone who lives, works, and plays here, enjoys a broad range of quality transportation choices. These transportation choices, which connect us to the people and places that matter most, are the result of investing in bold visions for the future of transportation.

Most recently, the region adopted Transport 2050, which builds on Metro Vancouver’s solid foundation of regional planning, to deliver the next 30 years of transportation improvements.

Now, we’re in the process of stabilizing TransLink’s funding following the COVID-19 pandemic, which is having a significant impact on transit ridership and fare revenue. The 2022 Investment Plan will help TransLink maintain the current transit system, advance strategic projects, and replace lost revenue.

At the same time, we’re taking the first step in delivering the first decade of investments as outlined in Transport 2050. 10-Year Priorities is a bold and ambitious blueprint that sets out overarching goals and strategies to ensure an accessible transportation system that is convenient, reliable, affordable, safe & comfortable, and carbon-free.

Learn more in the Background Information tab.

CLOSED: Thank you for your interest, but this public engagement has concluded.

Do you have any questions about the 2022 Investment Plan or Transport 2050: 10-Year Priorities? Feel free to ask away! The TransLink Public Affairs team will respond within a few business days. 

  • What's the difference between Bus Rapid Transit and Rapid Buses like the R4, R5, etc?

    JS asked 9 months ago

    Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) is fully traffic separated rapid transit that provides high-frequency, high-capacity service on high-demand corridors. It can be built at a fraction of the cost of rail-based technology and can be built in a fraction of the time.

    A BRT system has three defining characteristics:

    1. Traffic separation and signal priority: vehicles are separated (often physically) from general traffic in their own lanes, keeping them speedy and reliable. At intersections, BRT vehicles have signal priority over general traffic.
    2. Fast and convenient boarding: to keep the system fast, customers prepay and board through multiple doors, minimizing the amount of time a vehicle needs to remain stopped. Stations are modern, high quality, and built at street level, making them easy to access.
    3. Specialized vehicles: to enable high passenger capacities, buses are longer and have spacious interiors, which in combination with amenities help put the customer experience at the forefront. Vehicles would be electric or produce zero-emissions.


    Because of the traffic separated nature of BRT, the reliability and frequency of this service will be greater than RapidBus, which shares the road with general traffic. However, RapidBus is up to 20 per cent faster than traditional bus service with higher frequencies, fewer stops, and all-door boarding. RapidBus may also include some dedicated bus lanes and bus priority changes to intersections.

  • I have a question and a comment. Question: Could you confirm that when you say "exploring options for a dedicated transit crossing across the Burrard Inlet", you don't mean putting a dedicated bus lane on the Lionsgate and Second narrows. Comment: Putting in a dedicated bus lane on the bridges without a sensible alternative in the form of mass transit skytrain to the north shore would cause traffic chaos. As a minimum skytrain to lonsdale quay; ideally the route would be from Park Royal to Dollarton under Marine; Esplanade; Main streets. Combining this with park and rides, gives people a convenient alternative to driving their cars.

    CH123 asked 9 months ago

    Any “dedicated transit crossing across the Burrard Inlet” would be fully separated from traffic, and is a separate investment from the Bus Rapid Transit line, and is NOT dedicated bus lanes on the bridges.

    Additionally, as quoted, TransLink’s CEO and Mayor Buchanan have stated BRT would NOT be taking away lanes on the bridges.  Sources: Mayors, TransLink commit to rapid transit connection to congested North Shore | CBC News; What is in the 10-year transit plan for the North Shore? - North Shore News (nsnews.com).  

  • Wouldn't the total cost be more to implement BRT to the North Shore during year 1-5 and then upgrade to fully traffic-separate rapid transit (i.e. Skytrain) sometime in the future, then to build Skytrain to the North Shore from the very beginning?

    Joe Lee asked 9 months ago

    While you are correct, implementing a BRT line and delivering a fully traffic-separated rapid transit line (in essence 2 lines) would be more expensive than just delivering fully traffic-separated rapid transit (1 line), the BRT infrastructure could be repurposed to improve the speed and reliability of other bus routes in the future.

    Additionally, we heard there is urgency to improve transit connections to/from the North Shore. Given BRT generally takes 2-3 years to deliver and cost around $15 million per kilometre, while SkyTrain can take 10-12 years and cost around $400 million per kilometre, and the complexity of a new water crossing, we are proposing to implement BRT and bus improvements during years 1-5 while we work on a fully traffic-separated rapid transit connection.

  • Canada Line allows Bikes at all time. When will E & M lines allow that?

    NathanDavidowiczYVR asked 9 months ago

    The 10-Year Priorities includes a variety of investments to improve cycling in the region including historic investments into all ages and abilities bike facilities, secure bike parking and expansion of shared micromobility options including bikes.

    With respect to allowing bicycles on transit vehicles, bikes are currently allowed on bus racks at all times, and on SkyTrain outside of peak hours and directions. The 10-Year Priorities includes increasing the frequency and capacity of SkyTrain and bus service that will make more space for bikes at most times of the day. It is unlikely that bikes will be allowed on SkyTrain cars during peak travel in peak direction in the foreseeable future as this is a very expensive and challenging to accommodate. Peak service on the SkyTrain is amongst the most expensive service to provide across the entire system. It is not cost effective to build enough additional capacity during the peak to accommodate bicycles.

    By investing in increased micro and shared mobility options, including bike share as well as secure bike parking at stations, we hope to provide other green mobility options that can accommodate more people more cost effectively.

  • Why is BRT and traditional bus/trolley service lumped together with ALRT in many of the survey questions which simply ask if one supports the changes or not?

    Peter Boothroyd asked 10 months ago

    When creating a survey tool for a project, there are a number of considerations to balance, including gathering information required by our Planning teams and making it user-friendly for the people taking the survey. As a trade-off to make the survey a manageable length, while still capturing useful feedback on the plans, we included multiple open-ended questions, so people could include comments on elements of the 2022 Investment Plan and Transport 2050 10-Year Priorities that weren’t included in the scaled questions. And while the survey serves as the main method of capturing public input on the plans, feedback submitted by email or phone will also be included in the engagement summary report.

  • Thanks very much for the quick reply. Could you tell me which stations are the 6 chosen for washrooms? And given that it is in the 2022 investment plan, does that mean they will be constructed in 2022? I look forward to using at least some of them!

    Beth Hutchinson asked 10 months ago

    The location of customer washrooms will be decided based on TransLink’s customer washroom policy: at high transfer volume locations, with long elapsed journey times and relatively evenly spaced on the regional Transit network. The project workplan and schedule is still being developed. 

  • I noticed upgrades to BRT for the existing R2 and R5 routes. I was wondering what the plans were for the R4 and what the future plans are for the R4 route.

    George asked 9 months ago

    The 10-Year Priorities will be increasing bus service to reduce wait times and overcrowding on most routes in the region, including the R4. Also, additional transit planning study on the long-term needs of the 41st/49th Ave corridor will determine what future upgrades are needed.

  • I don't understand in Guildford Exchange or Surrey Central no bus service running to Bridgeport Station so people live in Guildford area can faster get connection to Vancouver International Airport and Richmond area. Another bus route from Guildford Exchange or Surrey Central to Tawwassan ferry terminal. These are very important bus routes for fast growing population.

    Stan asked 10 months ago

    Although the 10-Year Priorities does not propose direct express service from Guildford or Surrey Central to Bridgeport or to Tsawwassen, the plan does include Bus Rapid Transit to connect to Newton and from there an express service to Richmond-Brighouse Station. From there, transfers can be made to YVR via Canada Line or  express service to Tsawwassen via Bridgeport Station on the Canada Line.

  • When will u make transit green by allowing bikes on all routes 24/7 ???

    Norm asked 10 months ago

    The 10-Year Priorities includes a variety of investments to improve cycling in the region including historic investments into all ages and abilities bike facilities, secure bike parking and expansion of shared micromobility options including bikes.

    With respect to allowing bicycles on transit vehicles, bikes are currently allowed on bus racks at all times, and on SkyTrain outside of peak hours and directions. The 10-Year Priorities includes increasing the frequency and capacity of SkyTrain and bus service that will make more space for bikes at most times of the day. It is unlikely that bikes will be allowed on SkyTrain cars during peak travel in peak direction in the foreseeable future as this is a very expensive and challenging to accommodate. Peak service on the SkyTrain is amongst the most expensive service to provide across the entire system. It is not cost effective to build enough additional capacity during the peak to accommodate bicycles.

    By investing in increased micro and shared mobility options, including bike share as well as secure bike parking at stations, we hope to provide other green mobility options that can accommodate more people more cost effectively.

  • How can the planned rapid buses work without removing lanes for cars (will have to remove car lanes to make it work which is ok) E:G the 240 from N Van to DT backs up along Marine Drive with cars blocking the way now, and then to an inadequate 3 lane LG bridge as it is. Need above ground skytrain to N Shore as a real fix to the NS transit problems. Also, the current 240 bus route needs double length buses all day now (instead of 1 out of 4 buses) , the R2 NS bus has the double length buses with a really low loading factor and runs every 7 mins. The R2 Should run DT instead of to Park Royal.

    BB asked 10 months ago

    Additional work and public consultation will be needed to determine any potential lane reallocation for Bus Rapid Transit (BRT). At this point in time, we are asking the public for input on which corridors should be prioritized for this additional work.        

    Regarding rapid transit connection to/from the North Shore, the 10-Year Priorities is proposing transit priority measures, up to BRT, where feasible, between Metrotown and Park Royal within the first 5 years of the plan, given the urgency of needed improvements.  Again, additional work and consultation will be conducted to determine any potential lane reallocation and transit priority measures, and their location along the corridor.

    At the same time, we will also be studying a fully traffic-separated rapid transit connection, confirming the best alignment, technology, grade separation, terminus locations, phasing, and options for a transit crossing across the Burrard Inlet. Implementation of this connection would begin in years 6-10 of the plan following a full business case.

    Your comments about the 240 and R2 have been forwarded to the appropriate team.

Page last updated: 02 Jun 2022, 12:39 PM